1. 1967 Chevrolet Corvette 427 Roadster

  2. 1967 Chevrolet Corvette 427 Roadster

  3. 1967 Chevrolet Corvette 427 Roadster

  4. 1967 Chevrolet Corvette 427 Roadster

  5. 1967 Chevrolet Corvette 427 Roadster

  6. 1967 Chevrolet Corvette 427 Roadster

  7. 1967 Chevrolet Corvette 427 Roadster

  8. 1967 Chevrolet Corvette 427 Roadster

  9. 1967 Chevrolet Corvette 427 Roadster

  10. 1967 Chevrolet Corvette 427 Roadster

  11. 1967 Chevrolet Corvette 427 Roadster

  12. 1967 Chevrolet Corvette 427 Roadster

  13. 1967 Chevrolet Corvette 427 Roadster

  14. 1967 Chevrolet Corvette 427 Roadster

  15. 1967 Chevrolet Corvette 427 Roadster

  16. 1967 Chevrolet Corvette 427 Roadster

  17. 1967 Chevrolet Corvette 427 Roadster

  18. 1967 Chevrolet Corvette 427 Roadster

  19. 1967 Chevrolet Corvette 427 Roadster

  20. 1967 Chevrolet Corvette 427 Roadster

  21. 1967 Chevrolet Corvette 427 Roadster

  22. 1967 Chevrolet Corvette 427 Roadster

  23. 1967 Chevrolet Corvette 427 Roadster

  24. 1967 Chevrolet Corvette 427 Roadster

  25. 1967 Chevrolet Corvette 427 Roadster

  26. 1967 Chevrolet Corvette 427 Roadster

  27. 1967 Chevrolet Corvette 427 Roadster

  28. 1967 Chevrolet Corvette 427 Roadster

Lot Number
54
1967 Chevrolet Corvette 427 Roadster
Scottsdale Auction

ESTIMATE: $125,000 - $175,000
CHASSIS NO: 194677S112893
• Only an approximate 300 miles since high-quality, frame-off restoration
• Powerful 427 big-block with L-88 heads and induction
• Detailed and show-worthy with limited use and proper care
• Equipped with desirable four-speed manual transmission

427 cid Mark IV V-8 engine, L-88 aluminum cylinder heads and induction with single Holley four-barrel carburetor, four-speed manual transmission, four-wheel independent suspension, four-wheel hydraulic disc brakes; wheelbase: 98"


While Corvettes from the 1967 model year were initially intended to feature the new Mako Shark show-car body style that would ultimately debut for 1968, concerns about the design’s aerodynamic efficiency and production-readiness caused its postponement for one year. However, this situation led to the release of the final, and what many fans argue, the best of all model years for the second-generation Corvette. The Sting Ray’s bodywork was given only a few cosmetic changes, with the major developments taking place beneath the Corvette’s hood. Although two 327-cid small-block engines remained, still rated at 300 and 350 horsepower respectively, the 427 Mark IV big-block returned in four versions, including the hydraulic-cam, four-barrel L-36 with 390 horsepower, the “Tri-Power” L-68 with 400 horsepower, the 435-horsepower solid-lifter, triple-carbureted L-71, the aluminum-head L-71/L-89, and the rare, all-out L-88 for “off road use” or racing, in Chevrolet’s official parlance.

Capable of sending its factory-fitted 7.75-inch bias-ply tires into thick clouds of billowing smoke with ease, the 427 Corvette was noted by Hot Rod editor Eric Dahlquist to handle very well, particularly at sustained high speeds, with the considerable mass of the iron block-and-head 427 V-8 offset by carefully tuned, high-rate front springs. Remarkably, the big-block Corvette’s weight distribution was surprisingly balanced, thanks to the setback engine placement within the confines of the Corvette’s trim 98-inch wheelbase chassis. While sales were down a bit in ’67 compared to the prior year, with many Corvette buyers waiting for the new-design Corvette slated to arrive for 1968, the final-year C2 earned high-profile praise as Car and Driver magazine’s “Best All-Around Car” for 1967. It also remains highly regarded by today’s collectors and drivers. In “Corvettes, 1953 to 1988,” Richard Langworth wrote “…the 1967 Stingray is arguably one of the best Corvettes ever built. All the styling clichés had been eliminated…four-wheel disc brakes allowed it to stop as well as go.” Randy Leffingwell also wrote in his book, “Corvette – America’s Sports Car,” that in 1967, the Corvette “...was the best Stingray yet…and all the appearance bells and whistles, trim and shimmer was removed from the car, making it the purest form that the Stingray body ever achieved,” adding “it was the best of the best.” A total of 22,940 Corvettes were produced for 1967, with the majority, numbering 14,436, were convertibles.

The 427-powered, four-speed 1967 Corvette Roadster offered here was comprehensively restored with the frame off and the 427 big-block engine upgraded using L-88 aluminum cylinder heads and an L-88 induction system including the aluminum intake manifold and big Holley four-barrel carburetor and L-88 specification radiator. This original 427/four-speed car was acquired by the consignor in 2008 and placed within an impressive private automobile collection, where it has clearly benefited from proper storage and maintenance virtually without regard to cost and use ever since. In fact, the consignor reports that only an approximate 300 miles have been traveled by the Corvette since the restoration was completed. Fastidious care under the current owner includes the installation of two new power-window switches for reliable operation and show-quality professional detailing performed during 2014. Weather gear includes a vinyl convertible top only. Impressive in stature, well-detailed, and ready to go, this 1967 Chevrolet Corvette 427/four-speed marks one of the finest model years of America’s Sports Car and delivers exceptional performance with its L-88 engine enhancements.

1967 Chevrolet Corvette 427 Roadster
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